STORY BEHIND THE ART OF Betsy Rogers-Knox

 
20th Annual International American Society of Botanical Artists & The Horticultural Society of New York
 
 

Franklinia

Franklinia alatamaha
 
Franklinia alatamaha, a large deciduous shrub or small tree, commonly grows to 25 feet. It is prized for its lightly fragrant white flowers, which bloom in autumn here in New England. The flowers resemble Camellia blossoms and the fragrance may remind some of orange blossoms or honeysuckle. Because the tree blooms in autumn the leaves are changing from green to orange-red and make a striking contrast with the beautiful cupped milky white flowers. The bark is striking as well, with its gray color, vertical white striations and ridged texture. 
 
These characteristics attracted me to the small tree at the historic Bellamy-Ferriday House and Garden here in Bethlehem, Connecticut. Capturing a moment in time in October, when all parts of the flower cycle were displayed, along with the wide range of leaf colors, was the inspiration and challenge for this composition. The flowers were painted first, before they wilted, and the leaves were preserved (in the refrigerator!) to paint a bit later. The unique bark texture was painted in the winter from photos taken earlier.
 
 
 
 
Read more about this artist’s work: 19th Annual International
  • © 2016 Betsy Rogers-Knox
    Franklinia
    Franklinia alatamaha
    Watercolor on paper
    18" x 16"