Back Story – Bios from Your Board

Rose Pellicano  

Originally appeared in The Botanical Artist – Volume 17, Issue 1

 

Born in Italy, Rose came to the US when she was 8. Fluent in Italian, English and Spanish, Rose became a junior high Spanish teacher in Brooklyn, then moved to Long Island in 1979 to start family life. Rose has always loved art and took classes for years, especially with Daniel Stone in portraiture and Marion Brown in watercolor landscape. 

Life in botanical art began in 1993 in a class with Anne-Marie Evans at Old Westbury Gardens. Anne-Marie mentioned that another Long Island artist, Diane Bouchier, was starting a group, the ASBA, and Rose became one of our first members. 

After that class, Rose and Harriet Carotenuto, Chris Davis, Nan Dedrick, and the late Ginger Tuttle painted together weekly, critiqued their work and inspired one another. Eventually named Art Botanica, the group decided to focus on native plants of Long Island, creating 56 paintings based on Ginger’s research. Art Botanica painted camellias at Planting Fields and showed them at the Royal Horticultural Society in London, receiving a Silver Medal. Flora of the Bible, was curated by Biedenharn Museum and Gardens in Monroe, LA, traveled throughout the US for six years. Through ASBA Honorary Director Mr. Kazunori Kurokawa, Art Botanica exhibited in Japan at East Meets West, with Green Grass, a Japanese botanical artists group. 

Rose says she’s not generally a joiner, but she believes that if you are part of an organization you should help if you can. On the board, she first was on the Nominating Committee, and she also coordinates the rental of ASBA’s Slide Lecture. Rose enjoys talking with people and reading letters from members who have good experiences presenting the show. It teaches people that there is more to botanical art than decorating your walls. 

Now a popular and dedicated teacher in Long Island, The New York Botanical Garden and Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Rose loves to share her excitement about botanical art and likes to help people develop as artists. Rose feels that botanical art has made her a better artist; much more observant of the world around her. It has given her a lot of joy and satisfaction. 

Looking back at her involvement with ASBA and her role on the board, Rose comments that she appreciates ASBA’s welcoming attitude, and that at board meetings, everyone’s point of view is discussed and decisions are made with a spirit of cooperation, solely for the benefit of ASBA. 

(Website Editor’s Note: although Rose has completed her terms of service to the board, she continues to serve as the coordinator of ASBA’s Outreach program.) 

  • Rose Pellicano and one of her many, many, paintings